Diabetes: treating hypertension

Web publication date: 28 March 2012 (based on April 2011 search)

Sandeep Vijan

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Overview

Hypertension in diabetes is classically defined as a systolic blood pressure of 140 mmHg or greater or a diastolic blood pressure of 90 mmHg or greater.[1] Hypertension is divided into three stages. Pre-hypertension is a systolic blood pressure of 120 mmHg to 139 mmHg or a diastolic blood pressure of 80 mmHg to 89 mmHg. Stage 1 hypertension is a systolic blood pressure of 140 mmHg to 159 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mmHg to 99 mmHg. ...read more. Stage 2 hypertension is a systolic blood pressure of 160 mmHg or greater or a diastolic blood pressure of 100 mmHg or greater.[1] However, guidelines now suggest that drug therapy should be instituted in any person with diabetes and hypertension, regardless of stage. This review focuses on adults with diabetes with stage 1 or 2 hypertension, but with no diagnosis of CHD, diabetic retinopathy, or nephropathy. Most studies on the subject do not differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes; but the underlying epidemiology and ages of the populations studied suggest that >95% of study participants are likely to have type 2 diabetes. The control of hypertension in people with diabetic retinopathy and those with diabetic nephropathy are described in separate reviews.

Latest citations

Allopurinol reduces left ventricular mass in patients with type 2 diabetes and left ventricular hypertrophy. (17 February 2014)

Evaluation of a specialist nurse-led hypertension clinic with consultant backup in two inner city general practices: randomized controlled trial. (31 January 2014)