Thromboembolism

Overview

Venous thromboembolism is any thromboembolic event occurring within the venous system, including deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism. DVT is a radiologically confirmed partial or total thrombotic occlusion of the deep venous system of the legs sufficient to produce symptoms of pain or swelling. ...read more. Proximal DVT affects the veins above the knee (popliteal, superficial femoral, common femoral, and iliac veins). Isolated calf DVT is confined to the deep veins of the calf and does not affect the veins above the knee. Pulmonary embolism is radiologically confirmed partial or total thromboembolic occlusion of pulmonary arteries, sufficient to cause symptoms of breathlessness, chest pain, or both. Post-thrombotic syndrome is oedema, ulceration, and impaired viability of the subcutaneous tissues of the leg occurring after DVT. Recurrence refers to symptomatic deterioration due to a further (radiologically confirmed) thrombosis, after a previously confirmed thromboembolic event, where there had been an initial partial or total symptomatic improvement. Extension refers to a radiologically confirmed, new, constant, symptomatic intraluminal filling defect extending from an existing thrombosis. Self-testing is where the patient is responsible for testing their international normalised ratio (INR) at home using capillary sampling and a point-of-care (POC) device. Dosing of warfarin and frequency of testing is advised by a health professional clinically responsible for their management. Self-management is where the patient is responsible for testing their INR at home using capillary sampling and a POC device. Dosing of warfarin and frequency of testing is also managed by the patient with support from the health professional clinically responsible according to an agreed contract.

Latest citations

Vena caval filters for the prevention of pulmonary embolism. ( 23 September 2014 )

Once versus twice daily low molecular weight heparin for the initial treatment of venous thromboembolism. ( 23 September 2014 )